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What to do when you have failed a Situational Judgement Test (SJT)

What to do when you have failed a Situational Judgement Test (SJT)

You are bound to be disappointed if you fail an SJT. But take some comfort in the fact that you are not alone. These tests are designed to cut down on numbers, especially important in today’s job market. Passing an SJT will put you in much more of a minority group!

So what do you do next?

  • Give yourself time to get over it. You are bound to be p***** off, you probably invested a lot into getting to the testing stage, whether it was time completing an application or simply the mental commitment to step up for a new challenge.
  • Don’t give up. Not getting through an SJT is not uncommon. What’s important is to keep looking for opportunities now you know that you are ready to progress your career.
  • See if you can get feedback. A lot of companies won’t give this out, but some might. Even if it’s just an auto-generated report it might give you some insight into where you went wrong. (We can help with this, complete our contact form with your report and see if we can help figure out any patterns in how you were answering)
  • If you aren’t passing SJTs it may be that there are areas where you could improve your performance. Speak to any colleagues you feel comfortable asking for feedback from. Make it easier for them by asking them to identify three things they think you do well and three things you could maybe do a little differently. Ask them to be as specific as possible, ideally with examples to help you understand exactly what they mean. Don’t be defensive about any feedback you get or you won’t be able to ask again!
  • If your current firm is good about developing staff, speak to your boss and ask if there is any chance you could get some 360 degree feedback as part of your CPD (continuous professional development). This will give you an even more robust insight into your strengths and weaknesses.
  • If the chance to do an SJT comes up again don’t wing it. You need to get some practice in and find out what you are doing right, and where you are going wrong. Click here to see our range of products that can help you.

Article written by: Hannah Vallance

Hannah Vallance is a Chartered Occupational and HPC Registered Practitioner Psychologist, she has over ten years experience of designing assessment solutions.

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